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Michael Burnbaum: Memory

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Michael Burnbaum: Memory

Article by Michael Burnbaum Michael Burnbaum









Michael Burnbaum: Memory

A great memory can help you succeed in school, in your job, and in life. It can help you learn faster, and fast learners are always in demand. And they make more money.If you’re willing to make a few lifestyle changes and learn powerful memory techniques, you really can improve your memory. My goal is to explain every strategy that can help.Not only will you learn memorization techniques, but you’ll also learn how to improve your memory through diet, exercise, sleep, meditation, and other ways. Plus, I’ll point out other resources along the way that you may find helpful.Stay Sharp with Brain Games. Keeping your memory sharp can be fun.Maybe It’s a Sleep Problem… It’s amazing how poor sleep can hurt your memory. If you have trouble sleeping at night or simply are not getting enough hours of sleep, it could be causing your memory problems.Fish Oil – The New Memory Fix. Do you or someone you know have problems concentrating? An Omega-3 deficiency sometimes causes this problem, because modern diets often don’t provide enough of this nutrient. In one study in Britain, school children with poor concentration and memory who received Fish Oil vitamins showed a big improvement in behavior and school performance.Grow New Brain Cells. Amazingly, it is possible to grow new brain cells (neurons) in the memory center of your brain. According to research, intenseaerobic exercise (such as running, biking, etc.) stimulates the growth of cells in the brain’s hippocampus.Memorize Like Never Before. The Memory Systems collection, a special group of memory techniques based on mental visualization and association, is the real miracle that most people have never heard of. Use these methods to memorize lists, definitions, reading material, phone numbers, people’s names, mathematical formulas, or virtually any other type of information.With memory systems, you can build a filing cabinet in your mind. In the same way you easily find documents in a filing cabinet by looking in labeled drawers and folders, these systems can be used to create “cues” (labels) in your memory for remembering the information you’ve studied.Often the problem with remembering isn’t that the information is not in your brain, especially if you’ve studied it. Instead, problems with memory usually involve finding (retrieving) the information.f you’ve never used memory techniques before, this video was probably a real eye-opener. The five minutes you just invested in watching it will pay off for years to come.The trick is to use mental images to label or “hook” the information in your brain. When you need to remember a particular item, you first recall the label. This is easy because pictures are much easier to remember than words or abstract conceptsIf you have memory problems, you might not be using your brain in the right way. The solution? Learn the best memory trick used by professional memory performers.These performers amaze us with all sorts of memory feats, such as magically remembering the exact order of the 52 cards in a deck (or even several decks!). You might assume these people have photographic memories, but you would be wrong. Most of them only have average memories.Instead, memory performers use a technique that I will call “Visualization and Association” (V&A). This is a fun memory trick that anyone who wants to have a great memory can learn. If you have trouble remembering your school work, or facts related to your job, or current events, or people’s names, or any other type of information, the solution is to learn V&A and make it a personal habit you use every day.Even if you only have an average memory – or even a bad memory – you can still use V&A to memorize things easily and well. Small children have been taught this t
echnique, so anyone can learn it.How the V&A Technique WorksMost people remember images better than verbal or written information. For example, I may be able to easily imagine the different homes I have lived in during my life, even though I might have a hard time remembering all the addresses and phone numbers.Images are concrete, while raw information is often abstract. With the V&A technique, you convert the abstract information into easy-to-remember mental pictures.Before I explain how to do the V&A memory technique, let me explain why it works. I have already mentioned that images are easier to remember. But it goes beyond that. Other important aspects of memory that V&A takes advantage of are concentration and repetition.If you can’t focus, you won’t remember what you are trying to learn. The V&A process forces you to focus. Why? Because you are actively using the material. To change facts into mental images, you must focus – you have no choice. Creating mental images is a powerful way to focus the mind.In addition, exposing yourself to the material over and over while creating images is repetition. If someone you meet tells you their name one time, you might or might not remember their name. But if they remind you during the conversation what their name is, you will remember their name more easily because you heard it more than once. (Most people we meet don’t help us out like that, though!) When creating your mental images, you naturally “repeat” the details until you get each image clear in your mind.So the V&A technique boosts your memory for three reasons:• Images are easier to remember than facts• Creating images forces you to focus• Reviewing your images is useful repetitionBy the way, V&A is not time consuming – it saves time. Creating mental images does take a few moments. But if you practice a little each day, you will get very fast.Think about this: how much time have you wasted repeating something over and over in the hope of remembering it, and then you forget it anyway? Use the V&A memory trick, and you will remember the information very well the first time. And it will stick.How to Do ItSo, how do you use the V&A memory technique? Let me explain using an example. This example is from science, but V&A is so basic it can be used to remember just about anything.Let’s suppose your biochemistry teacher asks you to memorize the most common “nucleotides”, chemicals that are part of everyone’s DNA.The teacher tells you there are five types of nucleotides: adenine, guanine, cytosine,uracil, and thymine.

Michael Burnbaum: Memory



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Michael Burnbaum: Memory










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